Feb 26, 2012

Fruit or Vegetable

Is tomato a fruit or vegetable?

You are probably going to tell me that tomato is a vegetable.  I would argue that it is actually a fruit.  Why?  Ur...  I don't know.  Seriously! What are fruits? What are vegetables?  I googled it and found out there is no standard answers.  It is summarised as followings:

From The Straight Dope
A fruit is the matured ovary of a flower, containing the seed. After fertilization takes place and the embryo (plantlet) has begun to develop, the surrounding ovule becomes the fruit. Yum. I won’t go on about the four types of fruit–simple, aggregate, multiple and accessory–which explain things like berries and pineapples.  

Feb 25, 2012

Restricted enrolment schools (Melbourne Eastern Region)


Due to facility limitations, Eastern Metropolitan Region has a number of schools with enrolments restricted in various ways. These schools are not required to enrol students outside their neighbourhood area unless they have spare places. They are referred to as having an enrolment ceiling and/or a designated neighbourhood area (formerly known as zones). 

Any additional students must be enrolled strictly according to Department of Education and Early Childhood Development priority criteria.

SCHOOLS WITH AN APPROVED ENROLMENT UNDERSTANDING

Designated Neighbourhood Area

In some instances the Regional Director may need to restrict new enrolments at a particular school and will therefore specifically designate the neighbourhood area (formerly referred to as a zone).  Children who live outside the Designated Neighbourhood Area cannot be guaranteed a place at that school even if it is their closest neighbourhood school.  The the following schools have an apporved Designated Neighbourhood Area:
  • Canterbury Primary School
  • Chatham Primary School
  • Hawthorn West Primary School
  • Heany Park Primary School
  • Karoo Primary School
  • Lysterfield Primary School
  • Park Ridge Primary School
  • Rowville Primary School
Please note that DEECD may need to review these areas according to changing accommodation pressures.  These boundaries may therefore be subject to change.

Enrolment Ceilings

The Regional Director may need to restrict new enrolments at a particular school by setting an Enrolment Ceiling.  The school can only take a specific number of enrolments each year.  Students for whom the school is the designated neighbourhood school will be enrolled first.  Other enrolments will be considered according to DEECD priority criteria.  For these schools, the designated neighbourhood school is defined as the school that is nearest to a student’s permanent residential address in a straight line distance.  The following schools have an approved Enrolment Ceiling:

Primary
Secondary
Balwyn North Primary School
Box Hill High School
Camberwell Primary School
Camberwell High School
Doncaster Gardens Primary School
East Doncaster Secondary College
Eastwood Primary School
Fairhills High School
Glen Iris Primary School
Glen Waverley Secondary College
Kent Park Primary School
Koonung Secondary College
Kew Primary School
Mount Waverley Secondary College
Kew East Primary School
Norwood Secondary College
Lilydale Primary School
Ringwood Secondary College
Mont Albert Primary School
Vermont Secondary College
Rangeview Primary School
Wantirna College
Surrey Hills Primary School
Warrandyte High School
Vermont Primary School

Wheelers Hill Primary School

Wonga Park Primary School

Yarra Road Primary School

Designated Neighbourhood Area AND Enrolment Ceiling

In some instances the Regional Director may need to restrict new enrolments at a particular school and will therefore specifically designate the neighbourhood area and set an enrolment ceiling.  Children who live within the Designated Neighbourhood Area will be guaranteed enrolment at the school if they wish to attend.  Children who live outside the Designated Neighbourhood Area will not be guaranteed a place at that school even if it is their closest neighbourhood school.  The the following schools have an apporved Designated Neighbourhood Area and Enrolment Ceiling:
Primary
Secondary
Auburn South Primary School
Balwyn High School
Hartwell Primary School
Kew High School

Canterbury Girls’ Secondary College

Community Schools

Community schools do not have designated neighbourhood areas but may have discretionary or specific enrolment procedures.  Please contact the school for further information.
  • Sherbrooke Community School has an enrolment ceiling and has discretionary enrolment procedures.  They must enrol all students according to a process agreed with Eastern Metropolitan Region.
  • Croydon Community School has no ceiling but has discretionary enrolment procedures.

Specialist Schools

Specialist schools do not have designated neighbourhood areas but may have discretionary or specific enrolment procedures.  Please contact the school for further information.
  • Bulleen Heights School is a specialist school with specific enrolment requirements.  It has an enrolment ceiling and must enrol all students according to a process agreed with Eastern Metropolitan Region.  This school, like other specialist schools, has specific entry criteria.
  • Wantirna Heights School is a specialist school with specific enrolment requirements.  It has an enrolment ceiling and must enrol all students according to a process agreed with Eastern Metropolitan Region.  This school, like other specialist schools, has specific entry criteria.

* Information extracted from Boroondara Network.

Feb 19, 2012

SUZURAN Japan Foods


(03) 9882 2349
1025 Burke Road,
Suzuran on UrbanspoonCamberwell, VIC 3124

Cost: $10 ~ $60, take away only.

Looking for the finest sushi and sashimi take-away in Melbourne.  Go no further.  This is the place!

Trading Hours:
Tue to Thu  9:00 - 18:00
Friday      9:00 - 20:00
Saturday    9:00 - 19:00
Sunday     10:00 - 15:30

Price List:

Feb 8, 2012

Should I Turn Off The Energy-Saving Lighting Often?

To combat the cost of electricity, we are switching to energy-saving lightbulbs, which are mostly fluorescent lighting.

There are a few myths related to fluorescent lighting that prompts us asking this questions:
 Should I turn off the light when leaving the room?

The short answer is yes. Turn them off if you will be gone for more than 10 minutes. 


Myth #1: It takes more energy to start a fluorescent that it does to run it, so leave the lights on all the time to save money on your electric bill.

Reality: When you turn on a fluorescent lamp, there is a very brief jump in current when the ballast charges the cathodes and causes the lamp to start. This inrush of current can be many times greater than the normal operating current of the lamp. However, the spike of current draw normally lasts no longer than 1/10th of a second, and draws the equivalent of about 5 seconds of normal operation. So, if you turn your fluorescent lamp off and on more frequently than every 5 seconds, you will use more power than normal. So, normal switching of fluorescent lamps has very, very, very little effect on a power bill.


Myth #2: Turning fluorescent lamps off and on wears them out right away.

Reality: Electric lights have a published rating for expected life. This rating is in the hundreds of hours for many incandescent lights, and in the thousands of hours for most fluorescents. Fluorescent lights have a life rating based on how many hours they are left on every time they are turned on. This is usually referred to as "burn time", and for fluorescent lights the burn time is three hours.
Every time a fluorescent light is turned on, a tiny amount of the coating on the electrodes is burned off. Eventually, enough coating is burned off, and the lamp fails to start. Most full-size fluorescent lamps are rated to last 20,000 hours when left on for 3 hours every time they are turned on. This means that the lamp has roughly 6,667 starts available to use up. (20,000/3 = 6,667)

Longer burns extend lamp life. If you "burn" your fluorescent lamps shorter than 3 hours per start, you use up your potential starts faster. If you "burn" them longer than 3 hours per start, you use up your starts more slowly. However, you are paying energy costs for the operating time of the lamps, and the most efficient lamp is the one that is not on when it is not needed.

But longer burns use more energy. Operating a light when it is not needed is simply spending money for no purpose. Today's rapidly rising electric rates mandate that every building becomes leaner with energy use to control costs.

So I guess we have to find the trade off point.  There is a point where the amount of money you save from turning off the light exceeds the cost of reducing lamp life by more frequent This is too technical and for me it is not worth to worry about it.

If you like to read it futher, please see the site below.  I grabed more information from there and it explains in great details on the site.

* Information obtained from Lighting Design Lab.

Feb 7, 2012

Darac Grill & Bar


Darac Grill & Bar on Urbanspoon
(03) 9662 2441
51 A'Beckett St, Melbourne VIC 3000, Australia

Cost: $10~$15 per person

Darac Grill & Bar is a Korean restaurant that offers not just excellent foods, but also ambience for a relaxing dining.  

Dainty Sichuan

Dainty Sichuan on Urbanspoon 天府川菜馆
(03) 9078 1686
176 Toorak Rd, South Yarra VIC 3141

Cost: $15~$25 per person

Looking for Sichuan cuisine, look no further. This is THE ONE.

Cutting Boards - Wooden or Plastic

Had a argument about cutting boards with my partner this weekend. It prompted me into researching on it.  There are many types of cutting boards today.  What material is better in turns of sanitary?

This site has the best answers; it shows 5 major types of cutting boards with advantages and disadvantages.

Two other sites also show various information (1, 2).

At the end, you make your own decision no what's the best.  Wooden seems to be the best choice, but it requires constant maintenance.