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Native Bee Hotel

You can help our native bees to thrive by building them a Bee Hotel.

What are Solitary Bees ?

As well as Bumblebees and Honeybees (that live socially) there are various species of wild bees in the world that are called 'solitary bees' because they make individual nest cells for their larvae. Some species nest in small tunnels or holes in the ground or in sandy banks, piles of sand, or crumbling mortar. Others use the hollow stems of dead plants such as brambles, or tunnels previously bored into dead wood by beetles.

What is a Bee Hotel?

A Bee Hotel is an artificial bee nest that attracts solitary native bees.  It is often difficult to encourage solitary bees in urban areas because there are so few suitable nesting places for them.  Many people chose to give nature a helping head by building their own bee hotels.


How to build is a Bee Hotel?

To make a more sustainable hotel, it is preferable to user recycled timber, e.g. dead stems, bamboo, old fruit crates etc.  It is important not to use materials that will degrade in wet weather, such as chip board or cardboard.

Fill any size box/crate with your selection of different diameter cane and bamboo sticks.  You can also drill holes into existing blocks of wood to vary the size of the bee tunnels.  Please keep the hotel between 1~2m from the ground and positioned in full sun and there must be no vegetation in front of it obscuring the entrances to the tunnels.



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