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Surprising Things To Do In Australia

Here are a few  things you didn't know you could do in Australia.

1. Spot an alien in the UFO capital of Australia, Wycliffe Well. The Northern Territory outback town is a hotspot for sightings.

2. Go underground and explore streams that run through tunnels underneath Sydney's CBD. Tours are available by ballot only at the Historic Houses Trust of NSW website.

3. Check out one of Australia's great pink salt lakes. They turn pink from algae in the water, like this one in the Murray Sunset National Park, Victoria. You'll also come across the phenomenon at lakes in South Australia and Western Australia.


5. Visit an outback plane graveyard at Alice Springs Airport. The arid landscape is home to retired aircraft, like the famous Mojave Desert in California, US.

6. The world's steepest incline railway, Scenic Railway at the Blue Mountains, is now steeper with its recent revamp. The adjustable incline can be a real cliffhanger - at up to 64 degrees.

7. An entire garden of detailed, tiny villages in Canberra, Cockington Green Gardens has grown to include international areas, as well as its incredible English village.

8. Camping at Uluru is anything but ordinary at Longitude 131. The award-winning luxury tent-style accommodation offers breath-taking views of Australia's spiritual heartland.

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